Enable AHCI in Windows 8 and Windows 10 after Installation  

How to Enable AHCI in Windows 8 and Windows 10 after Installation

AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) makes NCQ (Native Command Queuing) along with hot-plugging or hot swapping through SATA Serial-ATA host controllers possible

Usually today’s motherboards will have AHCI enabled in UEFI or BIOS by default. Some older motherboards may have IDE enabled by default instead.

If you wanted to install Windows using AHCI instead of IDE, then you would normally need to have AHCI enabled in BIOS/UEFI first.

This tutorial will show you how to enable AHCI in Windows 8/8.1 and Windows 10 after you have already installed the OS (operating system) with IDE by mistake.

You must be signed in as an administrator to be able to enable AHCI after installing Windows.

This tutorial is an updated version for Windows 8/8.1/10 from the Windows 7 version our dear late member Ted (aka: Bare Foot Kid) created at our sister site www.SevenForums.com below.

AHCI : Enable in Windows 7 / Vista

It is recommended to create a restore point before doing this tutorial. This way if you make a mistake, you will be able to easily undo it by doing a system restore with the restore point.

Here’s How:

1. While in Windows, press the Win+R keys to open Run, type regedit, and click/tap on OK to open Registry Editor.

2. If prompted by UAC, click/tap on Yes.

3. In the left pane of Registry Editor, browse to the key location below. (see screenshot below)
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesiaStorV


4. In the right pane of the iaStorV key, double click/tap on the Start DWORD to modify it. (see screenshot above)

5. Type 0 (zero) for AHCI, and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

6. In the left pane of Registry Editor, browse to the key location below. (see screenshot below)
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesiaStorAVCStartOverride


7. In the right pane of the StartOverride key, double click/tap on the 0 DWORD to modify it. (see screenshot above)

8. Type 0 (zero), and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

This value will return back to 3 after you restart the computer later.

9. In the left pane of Registry Editor, browse to the key location below. (see screenshot below)
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesstorahci


10. In the right pane of the storahci key, double click/tap on the Start DWORD to modify it. (see screenshot above)

11. Type 0 (zero) for AHCI, and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

12. In the left pane of Registry Editor, browse to the key location below to see if you have the StartOverride here. If you don’t, then go to step 15 below. (see screenshot below)
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesstorahciStartOverride


13. If you do, then, in the right pane of the StartOverride key, double click/tap on the 0 DWORD to modify it. (see screenshot above)

14. Type 0 (zero), and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

15. When finished, close Registry Editor.

16. Boot the computer to your BIOS or UEFI firmware settings.

  • How to Boot to UEFI Firmware Settings from inside Windows 8 and 8.1
  • How to Boot to UEFI Firmware Settings from inside Windows 10

17. In your BIOS or UEFI firmware settings, enable AHCI, and save & exit to apply and restart the computer. (see screenshot below)

These settings will vary per brand and model number of motherboard. Please read your motherboard manual for more specific details about how to change SATA settings for it.

18. When Windows starts, it’ll automatically install AHCI drivers. (see screenshot below)


19. When finished, you’ll need to click/tap on Restart Now to restart the computer one last time.

That’s it,
Shawn

Leave a Reply