Microsoft's next-generation consoles, the Xbox Series X|S, are set to launch tomorrow, November 10. As we lead up to the launch, Microsoft has revealed a list of bugs and issues you might run into on your new consoles when you get them in your home.

Perhaps the most notable issue is that you may experience corrupted images or no signal on your TV if you set the console to 4K resolution at 120 frames per second with variable refresh rate enabled. This can happen even if your TV supports this input, and the issue affects TVs from LG, Samsung, and Vizio. Updating the firmware on your TV might help, but you may have to settle for a lesser image mode if it doesn't. Here are the potential workarounds described by Microsoft:

Update to the latest firmware on your TV

  • If using an LG TV – https://www.lg.com/us/support/software-firmware-drivers
  • If using a Samsung TV – https://www.samsung.com/us/support/downloads/
  • If using a Vizio TV – https://support.vizio.com/s/firmware-search

If the issue still persists, also consider trying the following:

  • Configure the console for 4K/60 with VRR by going to Setting> General> TV & display options> Video Modes> check the box for Allow variable refresh rate.
  • Configure the console for 4k/120 with no VRR by going to Setting> General> TV & display options> Video Modes> uncheck the box for Allow variable refresh rate. The resolution and refresh rates are found under “Display” in TV & Display options.
  • If you wish to experience 120hz and VRR, please configure for 1080p/120hz VRR or 1440p/120hz VRR by Setting> General> TV & display options> Video Modes> check the box for Allow variable refresh rate. The resolution and refresh rates are found under “Display” in TV & Display options.

If you are experiencing a corrupted image, here are your workarounds to reverting back to a safe video mode:

  • Restart your console and configure your video modes to one of the listed options above.
  • If you're still experiencing a corrupted image after restart, disable VRR on the TV. Please consult your TV manufactures on how to do this.
  • If the issue still persist after steps 1 and 2, perform the video mode reset sequence to get back to a safe state and configure for one of the two options above. To do this, follow the steps on this page here under “Your screen is blank after you turn on the console > Reset your display settings”.

This might be a bit of a bummer if you're buying the console because of these new graphics capabilities, but for most people, it's unlikely you'll have a TV that supports this kind of video output right now. Microsoft also notes that HDR game captures may look too dark when recorded on the new consoles, but a fix is in the works.

Another big new feature of Xbox Series X|S is Quick Resume, which lets multiple games be suspended in the background and resume instantly when you want to go back to them. This feature also has issues with "a select number" of games, so it may not work perfectly right now, but Microsoft is working on a fix on the platform level.

There are other issues, too. First off, the EA Play app is not available for Xbox Series X|S yet, so you won't be able to use it. Your subscription will still work, however, and you can download free trials or games included in the subscription from the Microsoft Store.

If you're more into media consumption, the BBC iPlayer app is also not available as of yet, though Microsoft announced last week that all media apps available on Xbox One would also work on the new consoles. Microsoft says it's working with its partners to add support for the new consoles to BBC iPlayer. Additionally, the PeacockTV app may display "occasional pixelated frames", but otherwise it should work as intended. A fix is also being worked on for this.

Finally, you may see a black screen when trying to play a DVD or Blu-ray movie on the new consoles, but this should be fixed by removing the disc, restarting the console, and inserting the disc again.

While some of these issues may be somewhat disappointing to see, they shouldn't detract from an otherwise solid evolution of the Xbox experience, which our own Rich Woods noted in his review of the Xbox Series X.